Meet Manisha Ropeta, The First Hindu Woman In Pakistan To Become A DSP

Coming from a middle-class family from Jacobabad in interior Sindh province, Ropeta says she wants to end this belief that girls from good families shouldn't have anything to do with the police or district courts.

By Anushka Vats
Fri, 29 Jul 2022 10:24 AM IST
Minute Read
Meet Manisha Ropeta, The First Hindu Woman In Pakistan To Become A DSP
Picture Courtsey: Twitter/@_currentpak

A Pakistan woman, Manisha Ropeta, is making headlines not only because she added her name to the list of a few female officers in authoritative positions in Sindh Police but also because the 26-year-old became the first woman from the minority Hindu community in the country to become a Deputy Superintendent of Police (DSP).

In a male-dominated country like Pakistan, it's difficult for a woman to make it to such a high rank in the police force as these professions are considered "manly".

Ropeta, while speaking about her journey, showers light upon the patriarchial environment she grew up in. “From childhood, I and my sisters have seen the same old system of patriarchy where girls are told if they want to get educated and work it can only be as teachers or doctors,” Ropeta from Sindh's Jacobabad area says.

Coming from a middle-class family from Jacobabad in interior Sindh province, Ropeta says she wants to end this belief that girls from good families shouldn't have anything to do with the police or district courts.

“Women are the most oppressed and the target of many crimes in our society and I joined the police because I feel we need 'protector' women in our society,” she says.

The officer is currently under training and will be posted in the crime-infested area of Lyari.

She also believes that working as a senior police officer empowers women and gives them authority. “I want to lead a feminisation drive and encourage gender equality in the police force. I myself have always been very inspired and attracted to the police work,” the DSP says.

Her three other sisters are all doctors and her youngest brother is also studying medicine.

On being asked about what made her choose a different profession, Ropeta says she had failed by one mark to clear her MBBS entrance examinations. “I then told my family I was taking a degree in physical therapy but at the same time I prepared for the Sindh Public Services Commission examinations and I passed that getting 16th position among 468 candidates.”

She lost her father at 13 in Jacobabad after which the family including her mother and four siblings, shifted to Karachi. She acknowledges that it is not easy to be in a senior position in Sindh Police and to get on-field training in a place like Lyari but she is looked at with respect by her colleagues, superiors, and juniors for her views and dedication.

The DSP is hopeful of playing a big role in making a clean and better image of the Police as many people still don't trust and thus don't report crimes.

(With agency Inputs)

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