Former Sri Lanka Cricketer Serves Tea, Bun To People At Gas Station Queues Amid Economic Crisis

The Sri Lanka government has approved a four-day work week for public sector workers to help them cope with a chronic fuel shortage. Scroll to know more.

By Ashita Singh
Sun, 19 Jun 2022 09:57 PM IST
Minute Read
Former Sri Lanka Cricketer Serves Tea, Bun To People At Gas Station Queues Amid Economic Crisis

Colombo | Jagran News Desk: Amid Sri Lanka's biggest economic crisis, people like Roshan Mahanama are inspiring people to help others. Former Sri Lankan cricketer Roshan on Sunday shared images of him serving tea and bun to those waiting in serpentine queues at a petrol station in Colombo.

Currently, Sri Lanka is battling its worst-ever financial crisis since its independence as there is an acute shortage of fuel and other things in the nation. Recently, the financial crisis struck the country and announced that it has only five days of fuel left which led to people forming queues at gas stations.

On Sunday, in a quest to ease people's suffering world cup winning cricketer with help of some other people served tea and buns to people waiting at the petrol stations.

"We served tea and buns with the team from Community Meal Share this evening for the people at the petrol queues around Ward Place and Wijerama mawatha.

"The queues are getting longer by the day and there will be many health risks to people staying in queues," the cricketer posted on Twitter.
Roshan also urged people to bring adequate fluids and food to stand in long queues. He appealed to people to be there for each other in trying times.

He tweeted, "Please, look after each other in the fuel queues. Bring adequate fluid and food and if you’re not well please, reach out to the closest person next to you and ask for support or call 1990. We need to look after each other during these difficult times."

Meanwhile, the Sri Lanka government has approved a four-day work week for public sector workers to help them cope with a chronic fuel shortage and encourage them to grow food.

Sri Lanka defaulted on its $51 billion foreign debt in April and is in talks with the International Monetary Fund for a bailout.

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