New Delhi | Jagran Trending Desk: NASA on Saturday shared a mesmerising clip showcasing a pinning, columnar vortex of wind - also known as a "dust devil" - cruising across the Martian landscape. Estimated to be about five feet wide and 50 feet tall, the dust devil was spotted by one of Curiosity rover’s navigation cameras on Wednesday, the space agency said in an Instagram post.

The short clip shows the dust plume passing through small hills just above Curiosity's present location on Mount Sharp, a peak within Gale Crater. 

“Mars is often a very dynamic place, due to its atmosphere and how it interacts with the surface. Right now, it's the “windy season” in the region where our Curiosity rover is operating. On Aug. 9, one of the rover's navigation cameras captured the frames in this animation showing a spinning, columnar vortex of wind - also known as a "dust devil" - moving across the landscape.,” NASA said in an Instagram post

“This dust devil appears to be passing through small hills just above Curiosity's present location on Mount Sharp, a peak within Gale Crater. The dust devil is approximately one-third to a half-mile (half-a-kilometer to a kilometer) away, and estimated to be about 16 feet (5 meters) wide. The dust plume disappears past the top of the frame, so an exact height can't be known, but it's estimated to be at least 164 feet (50 meters) tall.,” it added.

Watch the video here:

 

 
 
 
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Our Curiosity rover spots a “dust devil” on Mars 💨⁣ ⁣ Mars is often a very dynamic place, due to its atmosphere and how it interacts with the surface. Right now, it's the “windy season” in the region where our Curiosity rover is operating. On Aug. 9, one of the rover's navigation cameras captured the frames in this animation showing a spinning, columnar vortex of wind - also known as a "dust devil" - moving across the landscape.⁣ ⁣ This dust devil appears to be passing through small hills just above Curiosity's present location on Mount Sharp, a peak within Gale Crater. The dust devil is approximately one-third to a half-mile (half-a-kilometer to a kilometer) away, and estimated to be about 16 feet (5 meters) wide. The dust plume disappears past the top of the frame, so an exact height can't be known, but it's estimated to be at least 164 feet (50 meters) tall.⁣ ⁣ Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI⁣ ⁣ #Mars #Dust #NASA #Winds #SolarSystem

A post shared by NASA (@nasa) onSep 12, 2020 at 1:13pm PDT

The video has been viewed over 2 lakh times on Instagram in mere 10 hours after it was posted.

Posted By: Lakshay Raja