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Meet Oskar Sala, The Pioneer Of Electronic Music, Honoured By Google Doodle On 112th Birth Anniversary

On the occasion of Oskar Sala's 112th birth anniversary, Google Doodle pays tribute to the pioneer of electronic music.

Meet Oskar Sala, The Pioneer Of Electronic Music, Honoured By Google Doodle On 112th Birth Anniversary
Google pays tribute to Oskar Sala: Photo (Google)

Google is celebrating the 112th birth anniversary of Oskar Saka, a physicist and composer. The tech giant has paid a special tribute to Oskar Sala by making an artistic doodle dedicated to him. Also known as the pioneer of electronic music, Oskar Sala was born in Greiz, Germany in 1910. He used to play an instrument called the Trautonium, which is an electronic synthesizer invented in 1930.

Sala's mother was a singer and his father was an ophthalmologist with musical talent, and he was immersed in music since birth. He started performing classical piano concerts and learned piano and organ from a young age. He also studied piano and composition with composer and violist Paul Hindemith at the Berlin conservatory. Later, Sala developed an interest in trautonium, invented by Friedrich Trautwein. He got fascinated by the tonal possibilities and technology of Trautonium, and his interest also inspired his studies in physics and composition at school.

Later, Sala developed Mixtur-Trautonium, which had a unique design and was capable of playing several sounds or voices simultaneously. He created electronic music with his education as a composer and an electro-engineer. His work in electronic music made his music style different from others.

He worked on creating the scores for many films in the 1940s and 1950s. Later, he produced electronic soundtracks for many films at his own studio at Mars film GmbH and also composed soundtracks for radio and television, including Rosemary (1959) and The Birds (1962).

Later, Sala also developed the Quartett-Trautonium, Concert Trautonium and the Volkstrautonium. Also known as a one-man orchestra, Sala's work in electronic music opened the field of subharmonics, which is a sequence of notes that results from inverting the intervals of the overtone series.

Sala donated his original mixture-trautonium to the German Museum for Contemporary Technology in 1995. He received many awards for his work and contribution to electronic music.

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