Swedish startup develops 'rice-sized' implants to store vaccine passport under skin

As per the video, Sweden-based startup has developed an implant that can store a “COVID passport” that can further be read by a device using “near-field communication” (NFC) protocol.

By Mukul Sharma
Tue, 21 Dec 2021 04:09 PM IST
Minute Read
Swedish startup develops 'rice-sized' implants to store vaccine passport under skin
Image Credit: Twitter/@Ruptly

Stockholm/New Delhi | Jagran Technology Desk: The COVID-19 vaccine passport may become an essential feature of international travel, and technological advances have already started to take steps towards developing a system for it. According to a report by the South China Morning Post, a microchip technology introduced by the Stockholm-based startup Epicenter has claimed that it has developed the technology that can store an individual’s COVID-19 vaccine passport under the skin.

As per the video, Sweden-based startup has developed an implant that can store a “COVID passport” that can further be read by a device using “near-field communication” (NFC) protocol.

How exactly vaccine passports work?

The technology the company uses is called RFID (Radio-Frequency Identification), which uses electromagnetic fields to identify electronically stored information. The company claims that these microchips have already become very popular in many European countries and that the companies intended to be ahead of the curve in bringing it to the U.S.

Now they could become COVID passports.

What is Near Field Communication?

Near Field Communication (NFC) can best be depicted by the way you make transactions through a contactless Credit Card or a QR code by scanning it through your smartphone. As per the video, a specific device at airports or major public transport hubs can pick up the stored information of “COVID passport” embedded in the implant under skin.

Where can the implant be stored?

According to Hannes Sjoblad, the founder of Swedish Association of Biohackers, Epicenter’s “rice-sized” microchip, which has been adapted as a COVID-19 passport, can be implanted under the skin either between the thumb and forefinger or under the skin.

Have implants ever been used for identification?

A US-based technology company in August 2017 gave free microchip implants to its employees to access privileged services such as locked rooms and the ability to pay for food and drinks.

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