India's Second Monkeypox Case Detected In Kerala's Kannur

Monkeypox In India: The man arrived in India from Dubai on July 13. He started exhibiting symptoms of monkeypox after which his samples were sent to NIV Pune, where it was confirmed that he is suffering from the infection.

By Aalok Sensharma
Updated: Mon, 18 Jul 2022 04:47 PM IST
Minute Read
India's Second Monkeypox Case Detected In Kerala's Kannur
India's second Monkeypox case was reported In Kerala's Kannur on Monday. (Photo: Reuters)

India on Monday reported its second case of Monkeypox after a 31-year-old man from Kannur in Kerala was found infected with the disease. The man, who currently admitted to a hospital, arrived in India from Dubai on July 13.

He started exhibiting symptoms of monkeypox after which his samples were sent to NIV Pune, where it was confirmed that he is suffering from the infection.

"The 31-year-old man from Kannur is currently undergoing treatment at Pariyaram Medical College.  The patient's health condition is reported to be satisfactory. Those in close contact with him have been put under surveillance," Kerala Health Minister Veena George was quoted as saying by news agency ANI.

India's first Monkeypox case was also reported from Kerala, but from the Kollam district. The infected man, as per officials, had returned from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) after which the Centre sent a high-level team to Kerala.

"In view of the report of confirmation of a case of monkeypox disease from Kollam district in Kerala, the health ministry has decided to depute a multi-disciplinary central team to support the state government of Kerala in investigating the outbreak and institute requisite public health measures," an official memorandum by the health ministry last week read.

"The Government of India is taking proactive steps by monitoring the situation carefully and coordinating with states in case of any such possibility of outbreak," the health ministry had earlier said.

According to the World Health Organisation, monkeypox is a viral zoonosis (a virus transmitted to humans from animals), with symptoms similar to those seen in the past in smallpox patients, although it is clinically less severe.

With the eradication of smallpox in 1980 and subsequent cessation of smallpox vaccination, monkeypox has emerged as the most important orthopoxvirus for public health.

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