Delhi Reports 2nd Monkeypox Case As African National With No Travel History Tests Positive

Meanwhile, 2 more suspected patients of monkeypox, who are of African origin, have also been admitted to the LNJP Hospital.

By Ashita Singh
Mon, 01 Aug 2022 09:07 PM IST
Minute Read
Delhi Reports 2nd Monkeypox Case As African National With No Travel History Tests Positive

Delhi on Monday reported another case of Monkeypox. A 35-year-old Nigerian man living in Delhi, with no recent travel history, tested positive for monkeypox on August 1. This is the sixth monkeypox case in India.

He is the second person in Delhi to test positive for the infection. He has no recent history of foreign or local travel. The Nigerian national is admitted to the Delhi government-run LNJP Hospital, the nodal hospital for treatment of the infection.

He has had blisters and fever for the last five days. His samples were sent to the National Institute of Virology (NIV) in Pune. The report which arrived Monday evening showed he was positive. 

Meanwhile, 2 more suspected patients of monkeypox, who are of African origin, have also been admitted to the LNJP Hospital. 

Earlier in the day, Rajasthan reported its first suspected case of monkeypox. A 20-year-old, exhibiting symptoms of the disease, has been admitted to a government hospital. 

Meanwhile, on Monday, India confirmed its first monkeypox death, a young man in the southern state of Kerala with monkeypox symptoms who died on July 30 was found to be positive for the viral zoonotic infection.

"On the evening of July 26 he developed abnormal jerking and he had fever too. On July 27 he was admitted and on July 28 he was moved to the ventilator. On July 30 the hospital authorities informed the Health Department that he got tested on July 19 for monkeypox in UAE and the result of which was positive. Our team went there, unfortunately, that person died in the evening," informed Kerala's health minister.

Monkeypox is a zoonotic disease caused by the monkeypox virus, which belongs to the same family of viruses that causes smallpox. The disease is endemic in regions like West and Central Africa but lately, cases have been reported from non-endemic countries too, according to the WHO.

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