Delhi Govt Bans Entry Of Trucks, Heavy Vehicles From October 1 To Curb Pollution

According to reports, almost 70,000 to 80,000 trucks enter Delhi consistently. Vehicles that will be allowed into the city trucks carrying essential goods such as vegetables, fruits, grains, eggs, ice, milk and other food items; and tankers carrying petroleum products.

By Anushka Vats
Thu, 23 Jun 2022 05:59 PM IST
Minute Read
Delhi Govt Bans Entry Of Trucks, Heavy Vehicles From October 1 To Curb Pollution
ANI Image used for representation

The Delhi government on Thursday banned the entry of trucks and other medium and heavy vehicles in the national capital from October to February next year in a bid to curb pollution in the city-state.

In a statement, the Delhi government said no trucks would be allowed to enter the city from October 1 to February 28 next year. Usually, the state bans the entry of vehicles like trucks and mini tempos for only 15-20 days in either November or December.

According to reports, almost 70,000 to 80,000 trucks enter Delhi consistently. Vehicles that will be allowed into the city include CNG-run commercial vehicles; e-trucks; all trucks carrying essential goods such as vegetables, fruits, grains, eggs, ice, milk and other food items; and tankers carrying petroleum products.

Meanwhile, the step taken by the Delhi government has been opposed by trucks and commercial vehicle associations, saying those who deal with heavy vehicles will have to bear losses worth crores.

Rajendra Kapoor, President of All India Motor and Goods Transport Association, said that the ban on the trucks in the capital is acceptable for 15-20 days but banning them for months will affect the business. "Businesses will be seriously affected. This will also impact the government’s revenue and might culminate in a hike in prices of food, vegetables and other items," he said.

He further questioned, “Why is the ban only for trucks? Why don’t you ban other diesel vehicles in Delhi, saying if diesel is a prominent pollutant, the manufacturing of diesel vehicles should be banned. This is not a solution."

The Air Quality Index (AQI) of the capital had drastically fallen to low levels during the winter months in recent years. The levels of the pollutant Particulate Matter 2.5 or PM2.5 had risen pointedly in the winter months, attributable to industrial discharges, automotive emissions and crop-residue burning in adjoining Haryana and to the extent that Punjab.

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