African Swine Fever Case Reported In Kerala's Wayanad | Know All About The Disease

African swine fever is highly contagious and has no vaccine. It causes fever, nausea, and diarrhoea in pigs. Since the disease has no vaccine, the government has urged residents to avoid having pork.

By Anushka Vats
Fri, 22 Jul 2022 05:56 PM IST
Minute Read
African Swine Fever Case Reported In Kerala's Wayanad | Know All About The Disease
Reuters Image used for representation.

A case of African swine fever (ASF) has been detected in Kerala's Wayanad district. The disease was confirmed among pigs on two farms in the Wayanad district after the National Institute of High-Security Animal Diseases in Bhopal tested their samples.

An official from the Animal Husbandry Department informed that the samples were sent for tests after many pigs at one of the two farms died. "Now the test result has confirmed the infection. Directions have been issued to cull 300 pigs of the second farm," PTI quoted the official as saying.

Meanwhile, the Department mentioned that safety measures are being taken to prevent the disease from being spread. Earlier this month, the state had tightened bio-security measures following an alert from the Centre that African swine fever has been reported in Bihar and a few northeastern states.

African swine fever is highly contagious and has no vaccine. It causes fever, nausea, and diarrhoea in pigs. Since the disease has no vaccine, the government has urged residents to avoid having pork.

Earlier this month, confirmed cases of African swine fever were also reported in the northeastern states of Assam, Mizoram, Sikkim, and Tripura. Uttrakhand had also reported cases of the same.

A total of 63 mature pigs were reported dead in the month of April in Tripura. Before the incident took place, there were 265 mature pigs and 185 piglets in the pig shed of the farm.

India witnessed the first ASF case in Assam and Arunachal Pradesh in May 2020. The disease, however, does not cause any harm to humans but is deadly to pigs.

According to reports, a total of 73 countries across the globe have reported ASF since 2005. It continues to spread worldwide, threatening pig health and welfare. It has reached multiple countries across Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, and the Pacific, affecting both domestic and wild pigs.


(With agency inputs)

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